Appetite Depends on the Weight

Appetite Depends on the Weight
Thin people find it easier to resist the temptation to eat something nutritious than people suffering from obesity.

Robert Sherwin from Yale School of Medicine believes that it has biological reasons. The scientists have conducted an experiment inviting 14 healthy volunteers, 9 of whom were lean, and 5 were obese. With the help of MRI, the scientists explored the parts of brain that were activated when the person was shown pictures of high-caloriefoods, healthy foods and pictures on other topics. The scientists would also alter blood sugar levels of the participants and scan their brain at those moments when the level of sugar was normal and low. The experiment took place 2 hours after meals.

When the blood sugar was low, the parts of brain called the insula and the striatum, which are responsible for praise, would become active so as to indicate the desire to eat something. The prefrontal cortex, which usually removes an overwhelming urge to eat, could not completely stifle the signals to the striatum. This was manifested especially clearly in the case of obese people when they were shown the pictures of high-calorie food.

When the blood sugar level was normal, lean individuals demonstrated an increase in the activity of the prefrontal cortex, which reduced the activity of brain centers associated with praise. The author of the study believes there is a regulator, the highest function, which controls the center of praise. Such regulator is weakened in obese people. Perhaps, overweight people find it more difficult to disable parts of the brain that triggerappetite.

It sounds like a sentence: thick people will inevitably overeat and gain weight, while lean people will stay lean because it is biologically conditioned! The editors of Geniusbeauty.com hope that this is not true and that scientists will soon be able to control this area of the brain so that everyone could easily cope with the temptation to eat another piece of sweets.

  • Digg
  • Del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Reddit
  • RSS